The Founder (2016) Reviews

The Founder is a 2016 American biographical drama film directed by John Lee Hancock and written by Robert Siegel. The film stars Michael Keaton as Ray Kroc and portrays the story of his acquisition of the McDonald’s fast food chain. Nick Offerman and John Carroll Lynch co-star as McDonald’s founders Richard and Maurice McDonald.

The film premiered at Arclight Hollywood on December 7, 2016 and will open wide on January 20, 2017 by The Weinstein Company.

Director: John Lee Hancock
Writer: Robert D. Siegel
Stars: Michael Keaton, Nick Offerman, John Carroll Lynch
Genre : Biography, Drama, History
Release : Australia 24 November 2016 – Germany 20 April 2017

The Founder (2016) Reviews
The Founder is a biographical drama film starring Michael Keaton based on the life of American businessman and founder of the McDonald’s Corporation Ray Kroc. Whether you love the McDonald’s brand or hate it, this film offers a compelling view into the way it has captivated us all with its worldwide presence.

In 1954, salesman Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton) meets with brothers Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac (John Carroll Lynch) McDonald, the owners of the hamburger restaurant known as “McDonald’s”. Fascinated by the brothers’ ability to have burgers and fries cooked in a matter of seconds, Kroc suggests the idea of franchising the restaurant nationwide, hoping to use this as a way to take control of the company and earn money for himself.

Featuring yet another terrific performance from the ever-versatile Michael Keaton, his second best behind Birdman, The Founder is an interesting look into the way one man helped turn a small hamburger restaurant into a global fast food empire. It is fascinating seeing how one simple idea – fast food – has changed the culinary world forever. However, one cannot help but feel sorry for the misfortune the McDonald brothers went through as a result of franchising their name and the exploitation they received. I should also mention that the film reminded me of the 2010 film The Social Network, with its similar plot about one man exploiting a clever idea from two brothers for his own financial gain.

I rate it 8/10.
Don’t miss to watch this movie . . .!!!

The Founder (2016) Trailers

Neruda (2016) Reviews

Neruda (2016) Reviews.  An inspector hunts down Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet, Pablo Neruda, who becomes a fugitive in his home country in the late 1940s for joining the Communist Party.
Director: Pablo Larraín
Writer: Guillermo Calderón
Stars: Gael García Bernal, Luis Gnecco, Alfredo Castro

Neruda (2016) Trailer

Neruda (2016) Reviews

This is a fictional plot around the very real character of Pablo Neruda, the Chilean poet who, during the 1940’s, had also been a senator in the Chilean congress on behalf of the communist party. The film is set in 1948, when the authorities crack down on communists – a time that may be viewed as a chilling precursor to 1970’s Pinochet – and the basic plot is about Neruda’s escapes from the police, endeavors that force him all over Chile. Luis Gnecco as Neruda is fantastic and so is Mercedes Morán as Delia, Neruda’s aristocratic wife. At one level, the film offer a troubling inquiry into the personality of this esteemed poet-intellectual-communist. He is an admired spokesperson for the workers and the downtrodden but he is also a hedonistic drunk and a spoiled womanizer; rough and gentle, strong and weak, Neruda’s character and image keeps shifting, and it is to the credit of this film that it never for a moment tries to offer a solution to these complexities. In one memorable episode, a waitress asks Neruda, as he sits at a club-restaurant surrounded by his intellectual-hedonistic friends, suffused with alcohol, whether equality means that everyone will live like he does or whether it means that he, Neruda, will settle for less. I shall not disclose his response.

The camera-work covers a wide range of scenes, from film-noire urban settings to stunning snow covered terrains, all very precisely accompanied by period costumes, designs, motorcycles and horses. However the film aspires, and succeeds, to be by far more than a good period piece. Rather, it is a film about obsession. The psychological roots of this obsession are only hinted to, and this is a good thing too. And the obsessed is Gael García Bernal, playing the detective who relentlessly pursues Neruda. His performance is nothing short of stunning. As the film progresses, and it never rests for a moment, we gradually lose, alongside the characters in the film, any firm grip on reality. Just like in captivating poetic gestures, it becomes less and less clear what is real and what is fiction, what is an event and what is a fantasmatic representation of it, who is a character that actually acts and who is an imaginary ghost. And this is the film’s most important achievement.

 

Jackie (2016) Reviews

The Best Jackie (2016) Reviews. Read the Jackie (2016) Reviews. Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy fights through grief and trauma to regain her faith, console her children, and define her husband’s historic legacy.

Director: Pablo Larraín
Writer: Noah Oppenheim
Stars: Natalie Portman, John Hurt, Peter Sarsgaard

Jackie (2016) Trailers

Jackie (2016) Reviews

Throughout the history of cinema, there have been countless biopics of famous figures that deify their subjects and disregard faults in fear of tainting the idol they have so perfectly sculpted. In Jackie, however, Pablo Larrain subverts genre expectations in favor of a haunting psychological portrait of a woman caught in a terrifying piece of history. Famous images of Jacqueline Kennedy in her pink Chanel suit have lingered in the public’s collective memory for years, but here, Larrain allows viewers to experience the week following JFK’s assassination from the perspective of the woman who held his dying body in her arms. It’s shot in an episodic, frantic format that replicates the psychological turmoil of post-traumatic stress as the line between past and present blurs. One ghostly scene in particular – soundtracked by Mica Levi’s eerie score – follows Jackie as she wanders the White House in isolation, exploring various rooms and eventually falling asleep alone as a widow for the first time. The film’s central performance by Natalie Portman will no doubt gain great attention for its dedication to every last nuance of Jackie Kennedy’s mannerisms and voice, but the real success rests in Portman’s relentless and layered conveyance of emotion throughout the film. She does not allow the iconic figure to become a one-dimensional reflection of the public’s memory, but allows viewers to witness the conflicted feelings of nostalgia, grief, isolation, and tenacity that Kennedy experienced. The film successful solidifies the lingering of Kennedy’s melancholic face as a fleeting vision set across the 60s horizon, luminous and bruised at once, but enduring through history.